Sunday, 3 July 2016

Medicine Cards

From Medicine Cards by Jamie Sams and David Carson I have chosen Owl, the Sacred Medicine Bird associated with magic and observation of truth. 
The poem on the card is: 'Owl, Magic, Omens, Time and space. Does the truth emerge? Casting out deception, silent flight, Sacred Medicine Bird'. 
We are instructed to steer away from anything harmful and use the capacity of the owl to be aware, to see through deceptions and look behind us. We must be vigilant, see what others cannot see and move swiftly when we need to do so. Athena is the Goddess of Wisdom and her symbol is the owl, her familiar, which reveals unseen things to her so she can speak the truth to power with confidence. Originally a War Goddess, through wisdom she became the Goddess of Civilisation. I enjoy working with this deck which gave me the basics and I have gone on to develop each card as the subject of these magnificent creatures lends itself to greater and greater learning. 

Mlle Lenormand - Time-Life Books

Circle Network card deck review: Mlle Lenormand by AGM Urania are a deck of 36 cards based on the renowned 19th century card diviner, Marie Anne Lenormand of Paris. This is a special edition for Time-Life Books. The cards have no writing or numbers, just pictures on
the card faces which have a French 1700 ambiance (for instance, man on a horse with chateau in the distance and a lady in full French gown). Some cards have playing card features including court cards and each card carries a number and fancy M for Marie in a cartouche. These cards, known as the 'Blue Owl' were first produced in 1920 and originate in the Biedermeier period. A little white leaflet inside the pack provides information about Lenormand, how to shuffle, cut and layout the spread and what each card means and a sample reading is provided. The questioner/seeker is designated No 28 if a male or No 29 if a female. It is the position of the cards which determine the influences. All the cards can be laid out in a spread. Cards are 2 1/2 x 3 1/2 inches and are the size of traditional Lenormand cards. This deck gives the feel of the times, either in France or England, staid and centred! I like them and they are effective and inspirational for a reading. Review: Wendy Stokes www.wendystokes.co.uk

Saturday, 2 July 2016

The Key to the Tarot

Circle Network Book Review: The Key to the Tarot - What Tarot is - and how to consult it by A E Waite.
 

Arthur Edward Waite was born in 1857 in New York and was brought up in Jamaica and died in 1942 in Britain. This classic book was first published in 1910 to accompany a deck of tarot cards which developed as a result of the author's research at the British Library. Waite was a leading member of the Order of the Golden Dawn (along with W B Yeats and J M Barrie and other intellectuals of the time). This was where he met Pamela Colman Smith, the illustrator of this famous deck. He was interested in magic, theosophy, alchemy, the Grail, Rosicrucianism, Freemasonry and Kabbalah amongst other esoteric and metaphysical subjects. He was an occultist and exponent of higher mystery schools and considered the tarot could have been used by the Albigensians. His writing is ornate, academic and self conscious and is peppered with latin phrases and name dropping, but this allows us to enter his world of Edwardian England, with its feather quills and gas lamps and comfortable men's clubs and the moneyed and educated class of the time. 

Friday, 1 July 2016

Celtic Wisdom Pack

Celtic Wisdom Box by Caitlin Matthews provides information about ancient Celtic spiritualitty, with ceremony and ritual for today's world with prayers and blessings, the Wheel of the Year, the moon cycles, the land, seasons, how to set up a shrine and how to use the cards. The box contains a black metal pendant, small animal cards in black and white ink and a book of Celtic lore. This is a great little book to help us to mark and celebrate the seasons. I was delighted to find this in a shop in central London for a reduced price. If you see one, make it yours! Review: Wendy Stokes